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Fez El Bali
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Dar Seffarine Riad
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Bou Inania Madrasa
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Funduq Al-Najjariyyin
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Souk el Henna
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Chouara Tannery
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University of al-Qarawiyyin
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Khizanat Al Qarawiyyin
Fez

Kazim Rashid's Guide to Fez

Kazim Rashid's most recent work explores the seismic socio-political impact of 2001 on brown identity in the UK and across the world. Kazim shares with us all his top spots in in Fez, a city he describes as "majestic, mysterious and mystical in a way very few places I’ve been are. The way the Medina is still both the most beautiful and bustling place you’ve ever been after 13 years of visiting is a magical thing." Check his guide to his favourite city for all things architecture and history.

Kazim Rashid's most recent work explores the seismic socio-political impact of 2001 on brown identity in the UK and across the world. Kazim shares with us all his top spots in in Fez, a city he describes as "majestic, mysterious and mystical in a way very few places I’ve been are. The way the Medina is still both the most beautiful and bustling place you’ve ever been after 13 years of visiting is a magical thing." Check his guide to his favourite city for all things architecture and history.

Fez El Bali

"This pretty much deserves an entry in it’s own right - the sheer existence of the environment is enough reason to keep going back to Fez over and over again. The people, the food, the places, the energy, the smells - it's such a cliche, but simply get lost and you absolutely will not be disappointed... unless you get lost after midnight, in which case you might get locked in like me and a mate did, only to be rescued looking for somewhere to sleep by the caretaker"

Dar Seffarine Riad

"If you stay anywhere, stay here! You have to. It’s an incredible Riad. Small, but perfectly restored and well kept. The owner fled his home in Iraq as a teenager due to the war, traversed across land and ended up in Norway where he gained asylum status, fell in love and later trained as an architect. Eventually he visited Fez, fell in love with the city and he and his wife now run this incredible and homely Riad"

Bou Inania Madrasa

"This is a must see, if just because it’s one of the few buildings non-Muslims can enter. Luckily though, it’s one of the most magnificent and well kept pieces of Islamic architecture in the city. Historically this building was a place for Islamic intellectuals and academics to get together put the world to rights!"

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Funduq Al-Najjariyyin

"This is quite like the most boring title in history, and more importantly the best surprise. This is a museum dedicated to wood and craft. Still sounds a bit rubbish, but truth is once you’re inside it is brilliant. Loads of incredible, historical artefacts all carved out of wood. Loads of stuff you wouldn’t believe"

Souk el Henna

"I think this Souk is the oldest in the Medina, and basically the raddest. Got loads of amazing textiles and carpets shows. I have bought a couple of rugs in this exact souk from the same guy each time. I have no idea what the store is called nor what the shop-keeper is called"

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Chouara Tannery

"Most people do all their shopping for leather in Marrakech, but the best place to get stuck in to leather IMO is actually Fez. The tanneries are pretty gnarly, although they do absolutely stink! They’re really easy to find, swerve the touts, get stuck into the roofs and go roof-hooping… best way to see the tanneries"

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University of al-Qarawiyyin

"This is the oldest and continuously operated university in the world. It’s SICK! So beautiful, but also so so so rad that you can step into history and its still working… blows my mind! This university is also the site of a beautiful mosque - if you’re not a Muslim you wont be allowed in, however, pretend you’re married to one and you might just blag it, which is what my mate did last time she travelled with me. Important bit of trivia, this place was originally founded by two self-made female entrepreneurs"

Khizanat Al Qarawiyyin

"Let’s have it right, the world's oldest library is about as cool as it gets. It only re-opened a couple of years ago, having been closed for a very long time. Therefore, this is a real treasure for travellers. Weirdly hard to get into actually, I’m not sure why, but I think it’s largely because it’s reserved for locals and students so the tourist hours are limited. We ended up blagging the guard and sorted him a few quid for a tour"

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